This Week in the Law Library …

This week at the Law Library we’re teaching low cost and free legal resources, focusing on criminal justice and criminal procedure resources in honor of The Week Against Mass Incarceration, preparing for the MPRE, celebrating Women’s History Month, and previewing March U.S. Supreme and Ohio Supreme Court arguments.

This Week’s Research Sessions

Wednesday, Mar. 3, 2021

  • Prof. Smith’s Advocacy, section 5 with Associate Director Susan Boland
    • Low Cost & Free Legal Resources
    • 1:30pm – 2:55pm
    • Zoom

The Week Against Mass Incarceration

This week the National Lawyer’s Guild and the UC Law NLG Chapter are raising awareness on mass incarceration. This week’s library featured resources focus on criminal procedure since issues in criminal procedure contribute to mass incarceration.

Featured Guide

Criminal Justice Statistics & Data Sets

Criminal Justice Statistics and Data Sets

  • This guide serves as a portal to statistical resources, including statistical databases and data sets/archives for criminal justice and related areas. The resources on this guide are organized in different categories based on the predominate types of statistics found in the resources. Crime related statistics are sometimes unreliable as a consequence of a variety of factors, including but not limited to reporting differences, inconsistent labels and inconsistent definitions of criminal activity. Therefore, as much as is possible endeavor to identify the authority of the source and the mechanism by which the statistics were collected.

 

Featured Database

ProQuest Criminal Justice

ProQuest Criminal Justice

  • ProQuest Criminal Justice provides information on virtually any criminal justice topic¸ including corrections administration¸ law enforcement¸ social work¸ industrial security¸ drug rehabilitation¸ and criminal and family law.

 

Featured Study Aids

Criminal Procedure Study Aids cover art

  • Examples & Explanations: Criminal Procedure – The Constitution and the Police
    • This study aid provides an overview of Criminal Procedure, together with examples that illustrate how these principles apply in typical cases. The text gives students a sense of the theoretical flow and logic of law enforcement by following police procedural order. It includes a special section on terrorism in the United States and the Fourth Amendment ramifications. A series of problems at the end of each section or chapter assist you in testing your understanding. Answers are provided for these problems.
    • Available via the Wolters Kluwer study aid subscription
  • Principles of Criminal Procedure
    • This book gives you basic criminal procedure principles. It includes references to recent, relevant decisions handed down by the United States Supreme Court. In addition, Principles of Criminal Procedure contains helpful study devices such as “focal points” at the beginning of each chapter, and “points to remember” at the end of each section.
    • Available via the West Academic subscription
  • Understanding Criminal Procedure Vol. 1: Investigation
    • Understanding Criminal Procedure Volume One: Investigation is intended for use in introductory criminal procedure courses focusing primarily or exclusively on police investigative process and constitutional concerns. A chapter on the defendant’s right to counsel at trial and appeal and other non-police-practice issues is included in both volumes. The seventh edition of Investigation incorporates all of the major Supreme Court cases since the last edition was published, such as Riley v. California, Maryland v. King, Utah v. Strieff, and Florida v. Jardines. It also contains expanded coverage of issues surrounding searches of computers and internet traffic and a more in-depth exploration of the effect of United States v. Jones on Fourth Amendment search doctrine.
    • Available via the LexisNexis Digital Library (Overdrive subscription)

Featured Treatise

Federal Habeas Corpus Practice and Procedure — available on Lexis

Federal Habeas Corpus Practice and Procedure cover art

Federal Habeas Corpus Practice and Procedure is a two-volume set consisting of practical advice and analysis of U.S. Supreme Court cases. The treatise and the accompanying Supplement include extensive analysis of the latest habeas corpus case law as well as important statutory changes.

 

Featured Video

13th

  • Combining archival footage with testimony from activists and scholars, director Ava DuVernay’s examination of the U.S. prison system looks at how the country’s history of racial inequality drives the high rate of incarceration in America.

The MPRE is Coming and the Library Can Help!

Are you studying for the MPRE? Looking for study resources? Check out the MPRE resources on our Bar Exam Study Guide and the Legal Ethics / Professional Responsibility Study Aids!

MPRE Study Resources

 

March is Women’s History Month

The National Women’s History Month theme for 2021 continues the 2020 theme Valiant Women of the Vote. The theme honors the women who fought to win suffrage rights for women, and the women who continue to fight for the voting rights of others.

 

National American Woman Suffrage Association Records: Subject File, 1851-1953; Parades for suffrage

3 Great Resources for Exploring the Valiant Women of the Vote

  • Library of Congress, Shall Not Be Denied: Women Fight for the Vote Exhibit
    • This exhibit covers the fight for the right to vote from the pre-Seneca Falls feminist inspirations to ratification and beyond.
  • National Women’s History Museum, History of Women’s Suffrage
    • Elizabeth Cady Stanton–one of the Seneca Falls convention leaders–reminisced, “We were but a handful…” recalling the supporters of woman suffrage at the convention, where the right to vote was their most radical demand. Between this first convention advocating the rights of women and the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment guaranteeing women’s right to vote in 1920 lay a long and arduous journey. Victory was never assured until the final moments. In the intervening years, the drive for women’s voting rights encompassed the lives of several generations of women. Suffrage supporters survived a series of dramatic transformations in their movement that included: fifty years of educating the public to establish the legitimacy of woman suffrage; approximately twenty years of direct lobbying as well as dramatic militant action to press their claim to the vote; the division of each generation into moderate and radical camps; and the creation of a distinct female political culture and imagery to promote “votes for women.”
  • PBS, The Vote
    • One hundred years after the passage of the 19th Amendment, The Vote tells the dramatic culmination story of the hard-fought campaign waged by American women for the right to vote — a transformative cultural and political movement that resulted in the largest expansion of voting rights in U.S. history. Exploring how and why millions of 20th-century Americans mobilized for — and against — women’s suffrage, The Vote brings to life the unsung leaders of the movement and the deep controversies over gender roles and race that divided Americans then — and continue to dominate political discourse today.

 

UC & College of Law Events

All Month

  • 21 Day Racial Equity & Social Justice Challenge presented by the YWCA of Greater Cincinnati
    • The challenge is designed to create dedicated time and space to build more effective social justice habits, particularly those dealing with issues of race, power, privilege, and leadership. Participants will be presented with challenges such as reading an article, listening to a podcast, reflecting on personal experience, and more. Participation in an activity like this helps us to discover how racial injustice and social injustice impact our community, to connect with one another, and to identify ways to dismantle racism and other forms of discrimination. This is an exciting opportunity to dive deep into racial equity and social justice.

Monday, Mar. 1, 2021

  • AAUW Smart Start Salary Negotiation Workshop
    • 5:00pm
    • Negotiating increases your potential to earn more — and can make the difference for paying off loans, supporting your family, buying what you want and need and saving for the future. Join this session on Zoom to learn how to research your target salary, highlight your accomplishments and find the right words — and the confidence — to negotiate for better benefits and pay. You can sign up for a free in-person workshop or online course, which takes less than two hours to complete and can be done at your own pace.
    • Special guest, Meredith Winters Giesting, a UC DAAP ’11 alum and current Design Supervisor at Gemline and Adjunct Professor at the Massachusetts College of Art & Design.
    • RSVP

Tuesday, Mar. 2, 2021

  • Gotcha Covered
    • 7:00pm – 8:00pm
    • The Gotcha Covered condom distribution program is designed to increase condom distribution on and around campus for UC students. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), condom distribution programs are effective at increasing condom use, increasing condom carrying, promoting delayed sexual involvement, and reducing incidence of STIs. Currently, students can get free condoms from the Student Wellness Center during business hours. This program allows UC students to become a certified Gotcha Covered volunteer by attending a 1-hour sexual health education workshop. Once certified, students will be given a supply of condoms to have available for fellow students and residents. Currently, there are over 500 trained Gotcha Covered volunteers at UC.
    • Presented by the Student Wellness Center
    • Register

Wednesday, Mar. 3, 2021

  • 5th Annual Black Feminist Symposium: Radical Rest
    • An in-house conference dedicated to uplifting Black scholarship and celebrating Black voices, forums, panels, and lectures that are led by students, staff, faculty, and community members. The Black Feminist Symposium works to unite black feminist work being done amongst UC members with the community at large.
    • Keynote featuring Manon Voice
      • 5:00pm – 7:00pm
      • Manon Voice is a native of Indianapolis, Indiana, and is a poet and writer, spoken word artist, hip-hop emcee, educator, social justice advocate, and practicing contemplative. She has performed on diverse stages across the country in the power of word and song and has taught and facilitated art and poetry workshops widely, working with organizations such as Women Writing for (a) Change, Arts for Learning Indiana, Notre Dame Americorps, Regeneration Indy, Indiana’s WomIN’s Festival, Indiana Writers Center and Purdue University. She has been a featured poet and performer in noteworthy Indianapolis productions such as “The Wake”, “Village Voices Notes from a Griot” and “Nina High Priestess of Soul” with the Phoenix Rising Dance Company. Manon Voice has performed alongside Broadway singer and actress, Jennifer Holliday for Brothers United World AIDS Day, Indiana Poet Laureate Adrian Matejka, Artist and Songstress, Opal Staples, International Poet, and Philosopher, David Whyte, and has opened for acts such as WNBA Championship basketball player Tamika Catchings and Judge Joe Mathis. Her poetry has appeared in The Flying Island, The Indianapolis Review, The House Life Project: People + Property Series, Sidepiece Magazine and The World We Live(d) In anthology. She has been interviewed and featured in publications such as Indy NUVO, The Indianapolis Recorder, The Indianapolis Star, FAFCollective, and Pattern Magazine. She has been a panelist for Indianapolis based organizations, Indy10 Black Lives Matter, Don’t Sleep, Circles Indy, IUPUI’s Social Justice Symposium, and national organizations such as La Raza for Liberation focusing on the intersections of race, gender, art, and activism.In 2017, Manon Voice was awarded the Power of Peace Award from the Peace Learning Center of Central Indiana and in 2018 she traveled to Avila, Spain with the organization, Mystic Soul, to study contemplative practices through the lens of Saint and Mystic Teresa de Avila. In 2018, Manon received a nomination for the Pushcart Prize in Poetry. In 2020, Manon Voice was nominated as one of the four featured Art and Soul African American Artists with the Arts Council of Indianapolis. Manon Voice is also a recipient of the 2020 Robert D. Beckmann Jr., Emerging Artist Fellowship from the Arts Council of Indianapolis and was commissioned to create a poem for the Art Council’s equity statement. She is also a cohort for the 2021 On Ramp Accelerator Program with the Indiana Arts Commission and was a selected participant in the 2020 cohort for the Religion, Spirituality, and Arts Program through IUPUI. Manon Voice seeks to use her art and activism to create a communal space where dialogue, transformation, discovery, and inspiration can occur.
      • Register

 

March Arguments at the United States Supreme Court

US Supreme Court - corrected

From SCOTUS Blog:

Monday, Mar. 1, 2021

  • United States v. Arthrex Inc.: (1) whether, for purposes of the Constitution’s appointments clause, administrative patent judges of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office are principal officers who must be appointed by the president with the Senate’s advice and consent, or “inferior Officers” whose appointment Congress has permissibly vested in a department head; and (2) whether, if administrative patent judges are principal officers, the court of appeals properly cured any appointments clause defect in the current statutory scheme prospectively by severing the application of 5 U.S.C. § 7513(a) to those judges.

Tuesday, Mar. 2, 2021

Wednesday, Mar. 3, 2021

  • Carr v. Saul: whether a claimant seeking disability benefits under the Social Security Act forfeits an appointments-clause challenge to the appointment of an administrative law judge by failing to present that challenge during administrative proceedings.

 

March Oral Arguments at the Ohio Supreme Court

You can view the live stream of oral arguments on the Court’s website or see them after the arguments take place in the Ohio Channel archives.

Ohio Supreme Court Chamber

Tuesday, Mar. 2, 2021

Wednesday, Mar. 3, 2021

Thursday, Mar. 4, 2021

This Week in the Law Library …

This week at the Law Library we’re teaching administrative law, focusing on Civil Rights resources, celebrating Black History Month, and previewing February Supreme Court arguments.

This Week’s Research Sessions

Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2021

  • Prof. Oliver’s Advocacy, section 3 with Electronic Resources​  & Instructional Technology Librarian Ron Jones
    • Administrative Law Research
    • 10:40am – 12:05 pm
    • Zoom
  • Prof. Oliver’s Advocacy, section 1 with Electronic Resources​  & Instructional Technology Librarian Ron Jones
    • Administrative Law Research
    • 1:30pm – 2:55pm
    • Zoom

Featured Guide

Critical Race Theory Research

criticalracetheoryguide

Critical Race Theory “questions the very foundations of the liberal order, including equality theory, legal reasoning, Enlightenment rationalism, and neutral principles of constitutional law.” Richard Delgado & Jean Stefancic, Critical Race Theory: An Introduction (1997). This guide will help you find resources on CRT.

Featured Database

HeinOnline: Slavery in America and the World: History, Culture & Law

heinonlineslaveryinamerica

This HeinOnline collection brings together a multitude of essential legal materials on slavery in the United States and the English-speaking world. This includes every statute passed by every colony and state on slavery, every federal statute dealing with slavery, and all reported state and federal cases on slavery. Our cases go into the 20th century, because long after slavery was ended, there were still court cases based on issues emanating from slavery. To give one example, as late as 1901 Chief Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court had to decide if a man, both of whose parents had been slaves, could be the legitimate heir of his father, because under southern law, slaves could never be legally married. The library has hundreds of pamphlets and books written about slavery—defending it, attacking it or simply analyzing it. Hein has gathered every English-language legal commentary on slavery published before 1920, which includes many essays and articles in obscure, hard-to-find journals in the United States and elsewhere. Hein has also provided more than a thousand pamphlets and books on slavery from the 19th century. Additionally, this database provides word searchable access to all Congressional debates from the Continental Congress to 1880.

Featured Study Aids

Civil Rights Stories

Civil_Rights_Stories_cover

  • This study aid provides students with a three-dimensional picture of the most important cases that are addressed in civil rights courses. These stories give the students and faculty members a deeper understanding of the historical and cultural background of the cases and an insight into their long-term impact on the development of civil rights law.
  • Available via the West Academic subscription

 

Understanding Civil Rights Litigation

cover_understanding_civil_rights_litigation

  • This study aid covers all aspects of civil rights and constitutional litigation, including the history of civil rights legislation in the United States; the substantive elements of Section 1983 and Bivens causes of action; individual immunity defenses; governmental liability and immunity; procedural and jurisdictional hurdles; abstention; and remedies.
  • Available via the LexisNexis Digital Library (Overdrive subscription)

Featured Treatise

Civil Rights Actions

Civil Rights Actions cover art

Featured Video

February is Black History Month

This year’s theme for Black History Month is The Black Family: Representation, Identity, and Diversity.

Black History Month

Five More Databases for Black History Month

Below are just a few of the excellent resources that you can use to research black history:

  • JSTOR: African American Studies
    • Journals related to African American history
  • Kanopy: African American Experience
    • Kanopy is database of films that could be searched on topics related to the African American experience.
  • Oxford African American Studies Center
    • A comprehensive collection of scholarship focused on the lives and events which have shaped African American and African history and culture¸ coupled with precise search and browse capabilities. Features over 7¸500 articles from Oxford’s reference works¸ approximately 100 primary sources with specially written commentaries¸ over 1¸000 images¸ over 100 maps¸ over 200 charts and tables¸ timelines to guide researchers through the history of African Americans and over 6¸000 biographies. The core content includes: Africana¸ which presents an account of the African and African American experience in five volumes ; the Encyclopedia of African American history ; Black women in America¸ 2nd ed ; and the African American national biography.
  • Schomburg Studies on the Black Experience
    • The Schomburg Studies on the Black Experience¸ a unique database detailing the rich tapestry of the African experience throughout the Americas. Explore interdisciplinary topics through in-depth essays; read the seminal research and timelines that accompany each topic; and search for images and film clips to provide another dimension to your research.
  • Umbra Search African American History
    • Umbra Search African American History makes African American history more broadly accessible through a freely available widget and search tool, umbrasearch.org; digitization of African American materials across University of Minnesota collections; and support of students, educators, artists, and the public through residencies, workshops, and events locally and around the country. Umbrasearch.org brings together hundreds of thousands digitized materials from over 1,000 libraries and archives across the country.

 

Black History Events

All Month:

  • Black Lawyers in America
    • ABA National Town Hall Series featuring 3 African-American former presidents of the ABA
      • Against the backdrop of a global pandemic and economic meltdown, familiar tragedies have brought us again to another moment of outrage and protest. But there is something different this time. Perhaps the pandemic has given everyone – especially nonminorities – the grim understanding that African Americans have always known: Leaving the house for something as simple as a jog or a trip to the convenience store could turn fatal. This town hall series will examine the struggle for change and racial equity in the legal profession from the past, present and future.

UC & College of Law Events

February 23, 2021
  • Social Justice and Anti-Racism Panel Discussion
    • Taking off from last year’s “Red, White, and Soul” panel discussion featuring Black veterans who served in Vietnam, the AACRC and Veterans Programs and Services will team up again this year for Black History Month. An engaging veterans’ event featuring UC alumni, community and UC student veterans, this discussion will feature details about serving in the military as an African American. Narrated by UC alum and veteran Byron Stallworth, this event promises to provide insight from veterans from all ages who have hurdled challenges as well as received high accolades by serving in the United States armed forces.
February 24, 2021
  • 5th Annual Black Feminist Symposium: Radical Rest
    • An in-house conference dedicated to uplifting Black scholarship and celebrating Black voices, forums, panels, and lectures that are led by students, staff, faculty, and community members. The Black Feminist Symposium works to unite black feminist work being done amongst UC members with the community at large.
      • Reimagining and Dismantling Systemic Barriers to Black Women’s Economic Mobility in Cincinnati MSA
        •  5:00pm
        • At the Women’s Fund, we are designing a community where all women can participate, prosper and reach their full potential. The Women’s Fund leads our community in ensuring the economic self-sufficiency of women in our region and ignites a shared desire to improve it. We know this cannot be achieved without resolving systemic racism and sexism. That’s why we commissioned a multi-phased research project on Black women’s economic mobility to better understand regional opportunities and deterrents. This project consists of three research phases meant to build on one another to gain a deeper understanding of the factors that fuel and hinder economic mobility for Black women, as well as identify specific policy recommendations. This series will be released in 2020 and 2021 and will be comprised of: 1) a literature review of the historical context of labor trends and systemic barriers to Black women’s employment; 2) a quantitative analysis to understand Black women in the workforce, their economic mobility status and the impact of economic downturns; and, 3) a qualitative study to illuminate the factors fostering or deterring Black women’s economic mobility. Our goal with each of these phases is to recommend concrete actions that government, businesses, non-profits and other entities can enact to reverse these trends. Please feel free to review the Analysis of Black Women’s Historical Labor Trends & Systemic Barriers to Economic Mobility.
        • Presenter(s): Meghan Cummings, Adrienne Taylor, & Sam Molony | The Women’s Fund of the Greater Cincinnati Foundation
        • RSVP
      • Praxis as Practice
        • 6:00pm
        • “Racism as a fundamental cause” (Phelan, & Link, 2015) should resound within the halls of social science departments. From Black maternal mortality to the under prescription of pain medications, Black women have faced the physical consequences of hegemony in every institution (Collins, 2004). The Ellipsis Institute for Womxn of Color in the Academy strives to center womxn and femmes who are unable to escape structural violence (Farmer, 2004). Sonya Renee Taylor (2018) teaches us that centering the body can be a major tool for liberation. In academic and scholarly fashion, it is easy to delineate between the conceptual and the real. The Ellipsis Institute for Womxn of Color in the Academy intentionally calls into question the connective tissue between abstraction and reality. It is within this space that the most marginalized are understood to get the support and assistance needed, but the physical component of acquiring said resources falls short. By emphasizing bodily assaults and their connection with the disenfranchising and oppressive forces of the state, we are able to find where Black Feminist theory becomes praxis and can be fully exercised. This workshop style presentation uses two case studies to demonstrate how an organization can translate abstract conceptual concepts (racialization and victimization) into tangible programmatic interventions: ways to center bodies in our liberation work. We will go point by point on how we took the abstract idea of violence via hegemony and brought it to the personal both conceptually and logistically for the Ellipsis Annual Conference and subsequent academic publications.
        • Presenter(s): Presenter(s): Dr. Shemariah Arki (She/They/Ella) | Kent State university | Erin K. Phelps, MA (Erin) | Pierce College | Case Western Reserve University | the Ellipsis Institute for Womxn of Color in the Academy
        • RSVP
  • More than Dancing: Black Women and the Mythology of Post-Racial America
    • 6:00pm – 7:30pm
    • UC Blue Ash women musicians featuring Dr. Tammy Kernoodle in a segment of our PATHS Speaker Series. This presentation looks at four key events during Obama’s second administration as a lens to understanding the current wave of protest culture that has coincided with the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement and other variant social movements. It will specifically focus on the cultural responses of Black women as a method of illuminating the long and varied history of Black women musicians in shaping and promoting a public rhetoric of social change.
  • 7th Annual Onyx & Ruby Gala
    • 6:30pm
    • Hosted by UC’s African American Alumni Affiliate (4A), the Onyx & Ruby Gala will honor six alumni, staff and students for their leadership and impact on their fellow Bearcats. The event will also enlist support for the Shani Scholarship Fund which helps provide study-abroad and international co-op opportunities for Black students.
February 25, 2021
  • Black History Virtual Paint Party
    • 6:30pm
    • 4A presents a unique experience in which participants, working individually but also virtually as a group, create their own paintings with instruction provided by event partner Soul Palette, LLC.
    • Register online
February 26, 2021
  • UC Blue Ash Game Night: Black History Jeopardy
    • 7:00pm – 8:00pm
    • What is something fun to do on Friday nights? Join us for Black History Jeopardy and test your knowledge about Black history icons, events, music, and more.
    • RSVP on CampusLink is required.

February Arguments at the United States Supreme Court

US Supreme Court - corrected

From SCOTUS Blog:

February 22, 2021

  • Florida v. Georgia: whether Florida is entitled to equitable apportionment of the waters of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin and appropriate injunctive relief against Georgia to sustain an adequate flow of fresh water into the Apalachicola Region.

February 23, 2021

  • Wilkinson v. Alcaraz-Enriquez: whether a court of appeals may conclusively presume an applicant’s testimony is credible and true whenever an immigration judge or the Board of Immigration Appeals adjudicates a withholding-of-removal application without making an explicit adverse credibility determination.
  • Wilkinson v. Dai: whether a court of appeals may conclusively presume that an asylum applicant’s testimony is credible and true whenever an immigration judge or the Board of Immigration Appeals adjudicates an application without making an explicit adverse credibility determination; and (2) whether the court of appeals violated the remand rule as set forth in INS v. Ventura when it determined in the first instance that the respondent, Ming Dai, was eligible for asylum and entitled to withholding of removal.

February 24, 2021

  • Lange v. California: whether the pursuit of a person whom a police officer has probable cause to believe has committed a misdemeanor categorically qualifies as an exigent circumstance sufficient to allow the officer to enter a home without a warrant.

This Week in the Law Library …

This Week’s Research Sessions

Monday, Feb. 15, 2021

  • Prof. Sperino’s Legislative History & Statutory Interpretation Seminar with Associate Director Susan Boland
    • 12:30pm – 1:30pm
    • Zoom

Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2021

  • Prof. Oliver’s Advocacy, section 3 with Electronic Resources​  & Instructional Technology Librarian Ron Jones
    • Advanced Searching Techniques
    • 10:40am – 12:05 pm
    • Zoom
  • Prof. Oliver’s Advocacy, section 1 with Electronic Resources​  & Instructional Technology Librarian Ron Jones
    • Advanced Searching Techniques
    • 1:30pm – 2:55pm
    • Zoom

Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2021

  • Prof. Smith’s Advocacy, section 5 with Associate Director Susan Boland
    • Advanced Searching Techniques
    • 1:30pm – 2:55pm
    • Zoom

Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021

  • Prof. McCord’s Advocacy, section 4 with Legal Technology & Research Instructional Services Librarian, Shannon Kemen
    • Advanced Searching Techniques
    • 9:00am – 10:25am
    • Zoom
  • Prof. McCord’s Advocacy, section 6 with Legal Technology & Research Instructional Services Librarian, Shannon Kemen
    • Advanced Searching Techniques
    • 12:30pm – 1:55pm
    • Zoom
  • Prof. Lenhart’s Advocacy, section 2 with Associate Director Susan Boland
    • Advanced Searching Techniques
    • 1:15pm – 2:45pm
    • Zoom

Featured Guide

  • Federal Legislative History Research Guide
    • This guide is designed to help you understand the Federal Legislative process as well as what documents comprise a legilative history. It covers the major print materials, free web sources, and online databases.

 

Featured Database

  • ProQuest Legislative Insight
    • Congress produces a variety of publications as a bill moves through the legislative process on its way to becoming a law. A compilation of these full text primary source publications produces a legislative history that is valuable to a wide variety of researchers. Legislative Insight offers a research citation page that not only links to the full text of the associated primary source publications¸ but allows users to do a Search Within from that very page that searches the full text of all the associated publications with one-click. Full-text publication types associated with a legislative history include the Public Law¸ all versions of enacted and related bills¸ Congressional Record excerpts¸ and committee hearings¸ reports¸ and documents.

Featured Study Aids

  • Mastering Statutory Interpretation
    • Online via Lexis Overdrive
    • Mastering Statutory Interpretation explains the methods of interpreting statutes, including a discussion of the various theories and canons of interpretation. The book begins by exploring these theories and identifying the sources of meaning the theorists use to interpret statutes, including intrinsic, extrinsic, and policy-based. Throughout, the text uses the major cases in each area of study to explain how the canons work in practice. Finally, each chapter provides a concise roadmap and summary to introduce and encapsulate the most important material.
  • Examples & Explanations: Legislation, Statutory Interpretation, and Election Law
    • Online via Wolters Kluwer study aids subscription
    • This text covers statutory interpretation, lobbying, bribery, redistricting, campaign finance law, and voting rights. New to the 2nd Edition: coverage through the Supreme Court’s June 2019 decisions, including partisan gerrymandering, court deference to agency interpretations, and the litigation over a citizenship question on the 2020 census; updated discussion of textualist methods of statutory interpretation following the death of Justice Scalia and the arrival of Justices Gorsuch and Kavanaugh; consideration of how increased political polarization shapes the legislative process and judicial review of legislation; and updated material on campaign finance and voting rights.
  • Legislation and Statutory Interpretation (Concepts & Insights)
    • Online via West Academic subscription
    • This text provides an overview of the legislative process and statutory interpretation. It moves between the theoretical and the practical. It contains in-depth discussion of such topics as theories of legislation and representation, electoral and legislative structures, extrinsic sources for statutory interpretation, and substantive canons of statutory interpretation.

Featured Treatise

  • Sutherland’s Statutes and Statutory Construction
    • Recognized as a core text on statutory construction by the American Bar Association and others, Sutherland Statutes and Statutory Construction lays out the principles of statutory interpretation and helps you develop your own theories and positions supported by these principles, and by analysis of the legislative process itself. Topics include legislative power, legislative organization and procedure, legislative form, legislative applicability, statutory interpretation, and application of the principles of statutory construction in selected areas of substantive law.

 

Featured Video

 

February is Black History Month

This year’s theme for Black History Month is The Black Family: Representation, Identity, and Diversity.

Black History Month

Five Databases for Black History Month

Below are just a few of the excellent resources that you can use to research black history:

  • HeinOnline’s Civil Rights & Social Justice
    • A person’s civil rights ensure protection from discrimination based on race, gender, sexual orientation, national origin or ethnicity, religion, age, and disability. While often confused, civil liberties, on the other hand, are basic freedoms outlined in the Bill of Rights and Constitution. Examples of civil liberties include the right to free speech, to privacy, to remain silent during police interrogation, and the right to have a fair trial. The lifeblood of civil rights protection in the United States is the equal protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment (“No state shall make or enforce any law which shall … deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws”). Click through the pages in this database to learn how far our nation has come in fulfilling its promise of “all men are created equal” and how much further it still can go.
  • HeinOnline’s Slavery in America and the World: History, Culture & Law
    • This HeinOnline collection brings together a multitude of essential legal materials on slavery in the United States and the English-speaking world. It includes every statute passed by every colony and state on slavery, every federal statute dealing with slavery, and all reported state and federal cases on slavery.
  • African American Newspapers: 19th century
    • This collection of African-american Newspapers contains information about the cultural life and history during the 1800s¸ and is rich with first-hand reports of the major events and issues of the day¸ including the Mexican War¸ Presidential and congressional addresses¸ Congressional abstracts¸ business and commodity markets¸ the humanities¸ world travel and religion. They also contain large numbers of early biographies¸ vital statistics¸ essays and editorials¸ poetry and prose¸ and advertisements all of which embody the African-American experience.
  • African American Newspapers¸ 1827-1998
    • African American Newspapers¸ 1827-1998 provides online access to approximately 270 U.S. newspapers chronicling a century and a half of the African American experience. This unique collection features papers from more than 35 states including many rare and historically significant 19th century titles. Newly digitized¸ these newspapers published by or for African Americans can now be browsed and searched as never before.
  • Black Lives Matter from Exact Editions
    • Black Lives Matter from Exact Editions is “A freely available Black Lives Matter learning resource, featuring a rich collection of handpicked articles from the digital archives of over 50 different publications”

 

All Month:

  • Black Lawyers in America
    • ABA National Town Hall Series featuring 3 African-American former presidents of the ABA
      • Against the backdrop of a global pandemic and economic meltdown, familiar tragedies have brought us again to another moment of outrage and protest. But there is something different this time. Perhaps the pandemic has given everyone – especially nonminorities – the grim understanding that African Americans have always known: Leaving the house for something as simple as a jog or a trip to the convenience store could turn fatal. This town hall series will examine the struggle for change and racial equity in the legal profession from the past, present and future.

UC & College of Law Events

Monday, Feb. 15, 2021

 

Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2021

  • Black History Month Read-In – Featured Reader Dr. Pamela Scott-Goins
    • Join the us as we welcome Dr. Pamela Scott-Goins, Author of “My walk with my son with Autism. Everyone is welcome to read their own works or choose from books supplied by the UCBA library.
    • 11:30am, 1:00pm
    • WebEx
    • Register
  • 5th Annual Black Feminist Symposium: Radical Rest
    • An in-house conference dedicated to uplifting Black scholarship and celebrating Black voices, forums, panels, and lectures that are led by students, staff, faculty, and community members. The Black Feminist Symposium works to unite black feminist work being done amongst UC members with the community at large.
    • Surburbanoir Black Girlhood to Womanhood Navigating and Surviving White Spaces
      • “If I were born again, I wouldn’t want to be anything else” a quote that is hard to find but is stated by the poet, entertainer, and activist Maya Angelou as she described not wanting to be anything but a black woman even with our challenges and pain. Many black girls struggle with navigating white spaces. Unfortunately their experiences with tokenism from their white counterparts, microaggressions, colorism from their black peers, discipline disparities from authority figures, unrealistic beauty standards and more often leads to feelings of invisibility, isolation, low confidence, and lack of self-worth. I was this black girl. I am this black girl. Many of us are. Surviving these white spaces i.e. suburban neighborhoods, k-12 education, college institutions, work environments, and many more has caused hurt for black women and girls however it has also sparked resilience, helped many further explore their racial identity and pride, and lastly propelled black women to be exceptional leaders. In this session, participants will have a chance to a) learn about the lasting effects of toxic white spaces b) engage in storytelling as a healing process and share their journey with navigating these spaces c) apply various racial identity development models and feminist theories from our sisters Beverly Tatum, Patricia Hill Collins, and Brittany Cooper d) gain strategies on how to not only survive but thrive in white spaces and lastly e) utilize these strategies to guide black girls/women to do the same and maximize their leadership.
      • 5:00pm
      • Presenter: Rosalyn Robinson Collins (She/Her) | Xavier University
      • Register
    • Using Womanism to Empower Yourself and Others 
      • The concept of womanism was first coined by Alice Walker in 1979. Womanism, from her words, validates the experiences of African-American women while promoting a visionary perspective for the world based on said experiences. Womanism centers around inclusivity and activism through realistic goal-setting, appropriate responses to injustice, and most importantly, unconditional love for yourself and others. In my presentation, I will present what I believe to be the 4 tenets of womanism: femininity, wellbeing, universalism, and action. These pillars can be contextualized as a set of personal development tools as well as professional development tools. At the end, I want everyone to understand that femininty is not a weakness, but rather a superpower. Womanism is the poster child for that notion and my hope is that everyone can learn about womanism and how it could benefit them.
      • 6:00pm
      • Presenter: Mackenzie Fields (SHE/Her) | UC Programs + Activities Council (PAC) 
      • Register
  • Madam CJ Walker’s Gospel of Giving: A History of Black Women and Philanthropy
    • Professor and historian Tyrone McKinley Freeman, PhD, offers insight on a seminal figure in Black history and shares a variety of stories about her.
    • 6:30pm
    • Register

 

This Week in the Law Library …

Happy Valentines Week!

We’re all about love this week in the Law Library. This week’s library resources focus on love and the law.

Featured Guide

  • Family Law GuideLegal Technology & Research Instructional Services Librarian Shannon Kemen
    • This Guide provides a quick overview of general and legal materials on family law, including love, marriage, and children.The guide includes both free resources and, where indicated, resources only available to the UC or UC Law School community.

 

Featured Database

  • HeinOnline’s Civil Rights & Social Justice
    • A person’s civil rights ensure protection from discrimination based on race, gender, sexual orientation, national origin or ethnicity, religion, age, and disability. While often confused, civil liberties, on the other hand, are basic freedoms outlined in the Bill of Rights and Constitution. Examples of civil liberties include the right to free speech, to privacy, to remain silent during police interrogation, and the right to have a fair trial. The lifeblood of civil rights protection in the United States is the equal protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment (“No state shall make or enforce any law which shall … deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws”). Click through the pages in this database to learn how far our nation has come in fulfilling its promise of “all men are created equal” and how much further it still can go.

 

Featured Treatise

  • Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Family Law
    • Available on Westlaw for law students & law faculty
    • Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Family Law discusses the legal aspects of marriage, divorce, adoption, custody, parentage, surrogacy, visitation, assisted reproduction, and other family law topics from the perspective of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals. It contains analysis of issues related to post-heterosexual relationship custody and visitation; single party adoption and foster care; treatment of issues associated with assisted reproduction and surrogacy; two-party adoptions and judgments; custody disputes between former same-sex partners in cases in which both partners are legal parents; dissolution and separation issues where only one parent is a legal parent; marriage and other relationship protections; and transsexual marriage and parentage rights.

Featured Video

 

Featured Study Aids

  • Family Law: Examples & Explanations
    • Online via Wolters Kluwer study aids subscription
    • This study aid continues to identify and explore new trends in family law practice. It includes central topics such as alternative dispute resolution, domestic violence, alternative reproduction, premarital agreements, and professional responsibility.
  • Family Law in Perspective (Concepts & Insights)
    • Online via West Academic subscription
    • This book offers an interested reader insights into the ever-changing parameters of family law. Recent approaches to nonmarital cohabitations are discussed, premarital and marital agreements, surrogacy and assisted reproduction in the context of the 2017 Uniform Parentage Age, and the evolution of same-sex marriage after Obergefell v. Hodges.
  • Understanding Family Law
    • Online via Lexis Overdrive
    • Understanding Family Law includes coverage of topics such as traditional and nontraditional families, nonmarital and postmarital contracts, annulment, paternity and legitimacy, procreation rights, contraception, abortion, sterilization, artificially assisted conception, and adoption and termination of parental rights.

February is Black History Month

This year’s theme for Black History Month is The Black Family: Representation, Identity, and Diversity.

Black History Month

Martin Luther King Jr. & Love

Martin Luther King Jr. had a lot to say about love. Here is an excerpt on love from just one of his powerful speeches:

 

All Month:

  • Black Lawyers in America
    • ABA National Town Hall Series featuring 3 African-American former presidents of the ABA
      • Against the backdrop of a global pandemic and economic meltdown, familiar tragedies have brought us again to another moment of outrage and protest. But there is something different this time. Perhaps the pandemic has given everyone – especially nonminorities – the grim understanding that African Americans have always known: Leaving the house for something as simple as a jog or a trip to the convenience store could turn fatal. This town hall series will examine the struggle for change and racial equity in the legal profession from the past, present and future.

UC & College of Law Events

Tuesday, February 9, 2021

  • Vision Board Party
    • SALD and HGA present a Vision Board Party featuring guest speaker Patrice N. Barnes. Supply kits will be available in advance at SALD from 2/1 – 2/5, 11am-2pm and at the AACRC from 2/1, 2/3 and 2/5, 10am-6pm.
    • 7:00pm — 8:30pm
    • Sponsored by SALD and HGA
    • RSVP

Wednesday, February 10, 2021

  • UC Blue Ash Black Business Expo/Symposium
    • The Black History Month Planning Committee will be hosting a Virtual Black Business Expo with a panel of professionals and entrepreneurs who will discuss what they do and what it took to become established in their respective fields. Students are encouraged to RSVP to ask questions to the professionals and pitch their entrepreneurial idea to receive feedback in a safe and protected environment. Featured proposed panelists are Kim Jackson, Donny Harper (GO(O)D Apparel), Annette Redmond, Tyran Stallings, Lawrence Cain Jr., and Breya Champion.
    • 11:30am — 1:00pm
    • RSVP
  • Going Back in Time: A Story of HIV
    • A workshop in celebration of National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, this workshop is sponsored by funding from the Network of the National Library of Medicine HIV/AIDS Coordination Center and presented by the University of Cincinnati Libraries, the Midwest AIDS Training + Education Center, The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, and the Ohio Department of Health. The workshop is facilitated by HIV Peer Activist and Founder of Positive2Positive, Morris Singletary. The link to join will be provided upon registration.
    • 1:00pm — 3:00pm
    • Register
  • Combating Oppression with Radical Self-Love: How Loving Our Bodies Unapologetically Can Change The World
    • A discussion with Sonya Renee Taylor, author of The Body is Not An Apology
    • 3:00pm
    • Register
    • Sponsored by the UC Women’s Center
  • 5th Annual Black Feminist Symposium: Radical Rest
    • An in-house conference dedicated to uplifting Black scholarship and celebrating Black voices, forums, panels, and lectures that are led by students, staff, faculty, and community members. The Black Feminist Symposium works to unite black feminist work being done amongst UC members with the community at large.
      • 5:00pm
        • Presenter(s): Torie Wiggins (She/Her)| WellArts Cincinnati | CCM
        • The Well-Fed Artist and The Healthy Hustle: Navigating a Successful Freelance Journey Without Self-Induced Trauma
      • 6:00pm
        • Presenter: Akua RD Wilson (She/Her | AACRC – Miss Kuamka 2020
        • Session Title: So you want to talk about Intersectionality
    • Sponsored by the UC Women’s Center
    • For more information visit the UCWC website and register via CampusLINK.
  • A Discussion on Racial Justice Based on the Film “Whose Streets?”
    • Told by the activists and leaders who live and breathe this movement for justice, “Whose Streets?” is an unflinching look at the Ferguson uprising. Please watch the film before and come with questions. UC community members and Hamilton County library card holders can watch the film for free on Kanopy.
    • 7:00pm — 8:00pm
    • Sponsored by UC Sustainability and the African American Cultural and Resource Center
    • RSVP

Thursday, February 11, 2021

  • Marx Lecture: Detroit’s Property Tax Foreclosure Crisis: A Tale of Structural Racism
    • Though not as widely recognized as redlining and predatory mortgage lending, racialized property tax administration is a longstanding driver of the racial wealth gap.Historians show that it has been a common tool of displacement and extraction since Reconstruction. In the routine administration of white supremacy, local governments charged African Americans higher property tax rates while delivering them less in taxpayer supported services and foreclosing on their properties more frequently when they could not afford to pay the inflated property taxes.
    • Prof. Bernadette Atuahene
    • 12:15pm — 1:30pm
    • Register
  • UC Blue Ash Music Through the Decades
    • Showcasing Black musical icons artists and icons from the ’60s-’70s. Come learn about how music over the decades has changed the landscape of American music as we know it. You will also be treated to musical selections from those artists.
    • 5:30pm
    • RSVP
  • Black History Virtual Trivia Night with the UC Alumni Association
    • This fun social event offers the chance to meet other Black UC alumni while competing for various prizes. Register online.
      7:00 – 8:00pm
    • Register

Friday, February 12, 2021

  • Virtual Trivia: Black History Month Game Night on Kahoot
    • Test your knowledge about Black history icons, events, music, and more.
    • 7:00pm
    • RSVP

This Week in the Law Library …

This Week’s Research Sessions

Thursday, Feb. 4, 2021

  • Bankruptcy Law Research, with Legal Technology & Research Instructional Services Librarian, Shannon Kemen
  • Prof. Kalsem’s Bankruptcy class
  • 10:40am – 12:05pm
  • Zoom

 

Featured Guide

  • Bankruptcy Research Guide — Shannon Kemen
    • This Guide is intended to assist researchers interested in studying bankruptcy law. The pages herein provide suggestions for resources to locate relevant case law, statutes, rules, legislative history, and databases. The guide includes both free resources and, where indicated, resources only available to the UC or UC Law School community.

 

Featured Database

 

Featured Treatise

  • Collier on Bankruptcy
    • Available on Lexis for law students & law faculty
    • Written and edited by leading scholars and practitioners, Collier on Bankruptcy is the preeminent treatise in the bankruptcy field. Long recognized as the most authoritative and comprehensive single source of bankruptcy law information, and cited in hundreds of opinions each year, Collier is a benchmark authority. Conveniently organized according to substance and function, Collier contains comprehensive analysis of statutory and procedural bankruptcy law.

Featured Video

  • Bankruptcy Basics (Video) – US Courts
    • What is bankruptcy? What happens in a bankruptcy case? Bankruptcy is a legal process that provides relief for individuals who can no longer pay all of their debts. If you are considering bankruptcy, this video will give you basic information about the process, the relief it offers, and how to find the legal help you may need.

Featured Study Aids

  • Bankruptcy and Debtor/Creditor: Examples & Explanations
    • Online via Wolters Kluwer study aids subscription
    • This text covers the rules of bankruptcy law and applies them in context, using the examples. It covers the nature, source, and policies of bankruptcy law formation; the framework of the debtor/creditor relationship; unsecured debt; secured debt and priorities; debt collection under state law; fraudulent transfers; bankruptcy jurisdiction, the powers of the bankruptcy court; debtor eligibility and bankruptcy relief; commencement and dismissal of the bankruptcy case; the automatic stay; property of the estate; trustee powers; executory contracts and unexpired leases; claims against the estate; Chapter 13 and 11 plans. A series of problems at the end of each section or chapter assist you in testing your understanding. Answers are provided for these problems.
  • Principles of Bankruptcy Law (Concise Hornbook)
    • Online via West Academic subscription
    • This book focuses on the material covered in a typical law school course on Bankruptcy. It covers both business and consumer bankruptcy. The book explains basic bankruptcy concepts and then uses those concepts to make code provisions understandable.
  • Understanding Bankruptcy
    • Online via Lexis Overdrive
    • This book provides a detailed introduction to bankruptcy and related state and federal debtor-creditor law. It is equally useful in an introductory Creditors’ Rights course that emphasizes bankruptcy; a free-standing Bankruptcy course; or an advanced course in Chapter 11 Reorganization. It provides an ample explanation of the issues likely to arise in any of these courses, specifically including issues raised by the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2005.

February is Black History Month

This year’s theme for Black History Month is The Black Family: Representation, Identity, and Diversity.

UC College of Law & Campus Events Celebrating Black History Month

Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021

  • 5th Annual Black Feminist Symposium: Radical Rest
    • 5:00pm
    • Sponsored by the UC Women’s Center
    • An in-house conference dedicated to uplifting Black scholarship and celebrating Black voices, forums, panels, and lectures that are led by students, staff, faculty, and community members. The Black Feminist Symposium works to unite black feminist work being done amongst UC members with the community at large.
    • For more information visit the UCWC website and register via CampusLINK.
  • Leading While Black – How Startup Founder Candice Matthews Brackeen Sustains Success in the World of Venture Capital

Thursday, Feb. 4, 2021

  • COVID-19 & Black Americans
    • 11:00am – 12:00pm
    • Sponsored by the Taft Research Center & Department of Africana Studies
    • Zoom

Friday, Feb. 5, 2021

  • Anti-Racist Community Engagement Virtual Conference
    • 12:00pm – 4:00pm
    • Sponsored by the Greater Cincinnati Service Learning Network, Kentucky Campus Compact (KyCC) and Ohio Campus Compact (OCC)
    • Register

This Week in the Law Library …

This Week’s Research Sessions

Monday, Jan. 25, 2021

  • Prof. Smith’s Advocacy, section 5 with Associate Director Susan Boland
    • Research Review Using Federal Law
    • 1:30pm – 2:55pm
    • Zoom

Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2021

  • Prof. McCord’s Advocacy, section 5 with Legal Technology & Research Instructional Services Librarian, Shannon Kemen
    • Research Review Using Federal Law
    • 9:00am – 10:25am
    • Zoom
  • Prof. Oliver’s Advocacy, section 3 with Electronic Resources​  & Instructional Technology Librarian Ron Jones
    • Research Review Using Federal Law
    • 10:40am – 12:05 pm
    • Zoom
  • Prof. McCord’s Advocacy, section 5 with Legal Technology & Research Instructional Services Librarian, Shannon Kemen
    • Research Review Using Federal Law
    • 12:3pam – 1:55pm
    • Zoom
  • Prof. Oliver’s Advocacy, section 3 with Electronic Resources​  & Instructional Technology Librarian Ron Jones
    • Research Review Using Federal Law
    • 1:30pm – 2:55pm
    • Zoom
  • Prof. Ela’s Law & Capitalism Seminar Class
    • 3:30pm – 4:30pm
    • Zoom

Featured Guide

 

Featured Database

Resources to Help You “Spring into Action”

 

January Oral Arguments at the Ohio Supreme Court

You can view the live stream of oral arguments on the Court’s website or see them after the arguments take place in the Ohio Channel archives.

Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2021

Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2021

This Week in the Law Library …

Welcome Back!

It’s a new year and a new semester! UC Law classes are all virtual this semester but the Law Library is still here for you.

New Year, New Hours

Law Library Circulation Desk Hours

  • Monday — Friday 9am – 5pm

College of Law Building Hours & Law Library Access

  • Monday — Friday 9am – 9pm
  • Saturday 9am – 5pm

Martin Luther King Jr. Day Closure

Martin Luther King Jr.

The Law Library will be closed Monday, Jan. 18 for Martin Luther King Jr. Day but never fear,  all of our virtual resources will be available!

Service Note

  • The Library Catalog will be unavailable Wednesday, Jan. 20 as the two physical servers that house Sierra (UCLID/Catalog/ILS) will be replaced with new virtual servers. Thank you for your patience and understanding.

This Week’s Research Sessions

Thursday, Jan. 21, 2021

  • Prof. Lenhart’s Advocacy, section 2 with Associate Director Susan Boland
  • Research Review Using Federal Law
  • 1:15pm – 2:40pm
  • Zoom

Resources to Help You “Spring into Action”

January Arguments at the United States Supreme Court

US Supreme Court - corrected

From SCOTUS Blog:

Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2021

Where to Find Supreme Court Transcripts and Audio of Past Oral Arguments