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This Week in the Law Library …

This week in the Law Library, we’re teaching secondary sources; teaching legal research using terms and connectors; teaching technology in law practice; and celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month.

This Week’s Research Sessions

Tuesday, September 27, 2022

Lawyering I, sec. 3

Ron Jones, Electronic Resources Instructional Services Librarian
Room 145
10:40am – 12:05pm
Researching Secondary Sources

Technology in Law Practice

Shannon Kemen, Legal Technology & Research Instructional Services Librarian
Room 107
11:10am – 12:05pm

Lawyering I, sec. 1

Ron Jones, Electronic Resources Instructional Services Librarian
Room 145
1:30pm – 2:55pm
Researching Secondary Sources

Wednesday, September 28, 2022

Legal Research Competency Program

Laura Dixon-Caldwell, Instructional & Reference Services Librarian
l2:00pm – 1:00pm
Room 107
Legal Research Using Terms and Connectors

Students who complete the requirements of the Legal Research Competency Program before graduation will receive a notation on their transcript stating that they are competent with respect to legal research, a credential they can list proudly on their resumes as proof of the research skills they offer prospective employers. This is the first live session of the program. For questions, or to RSVP, contact Laura Dixon-Caldwell at dixoncla@ucmail.uc.edu.

Thursday, September 29, 2022

Technology in Law Practice

Shannon Kemen, Legal Technology & Research Instructional Services Librarian
Room 107
11:10am – 12:05pm

Featured Study Aids

Principles of Tax Policy by Stephanie McMahon

Available through the West Academic study aid subscription, this text explains the essential building blocks of the American tax system clearly and concisely, including the effects of changes adopted in the Tax Cut and Jobs Act of 2017. Chapters range from the political process to individual and corporate income taxes, Social Security and other payroll taxes, state and local budgeting, and international tax planning. Each chapter opens with a brief description of the covered policy topic, providing a synopsis of the current state of the law. Ample footnotes provide easy access to articles and standard reference works allowing readers to dig deeper on their own.

Federal Income Tax: Examples & Explanations

Available through the Aspen Learning Library subscription, this text provides students with a summary of topics and issues in federal income tax. Its index includes a Table of Cases and a Table of Internal Revenue Code Sections. Analysis is first provided for a topic and then examples are given to help students understand the analysis. A series of problems at the end of each section or chapter assist you in testing your understanding. Answers are provided for these problems.

Understanding Federal Income Taxation

Available through the LexisNexis Digital Library study aid subscription, this edition of Understanding Federal Income Taxation consists of forty-two chapters with each chapter addressing a basic topic in individual income taxation, e.g., the definition of “gross income,” the exclusion of gain from the sale of a principal residence, business deductions including the Section 199A deduction for qualified business income (added by the 2017 tax legislation), the treatment of capital gains and losses, the taxation of gains from the sale or exchange of real property, and the tax consequences of transfers between spouses and incident to divorce. Each chapter provides a detailed explanation of the interpretation and application of relevant Internal Revenue Code provision(s) and Treasury Regulations as well as summaries of leading cases and administrative rulings. The practical application of these authorities is illustrated in the numerous examples contained in each chapter. Because the provisions of the Internal Revenue Code are necessarily at the heart of tax study, each chapter also includes a part or all of the Code section(s) pertinent to the chapter topic.

Featured Database

Bloomberg Law Tax Practice Center

Bloomberg Tax integrates Tax Management Portfolios, Accounting for Income Tax Portfolios, primary and secondary resources, Practice Tools, and News to aid research on the most complex tax matters.

Featured Video

IRS Videos on YouTube

The Internal Revenue Service’s official YouTube channel features IRS videos to help America’s taxpayers understand and meet their tax responsibilities and enforce the law with integrity and fairness to all.

Featured Treatise

Federal Taxation of Income, Estates, and Gifts (WG&L) by Boris I. Bittker; Lawrence Lokken

This preeminent tax treatise, available on Westlaw, examines full range of corporate tax issues, including corporate organization, capital structure, income tax, Sub-chapters C & S, dividends and distributions, foreign corporations, and foreign source income.

Featured Website

IRS.gov

The Internal Revenue Service is the nation’s tax collection agency and administers the Internal Revenue Code enacted by Congress. This isn’t the prettiest website out there but it is full of official and authoritative information for tax practitioners and consumers.

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month

2022 Hispanic Heritage Month Poster

Hispanic Heritage Month is September 15 to October 15 and celebrates the contributions and importance of Hispanics and Latinos to the United States and those American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean, Central America, and South America. This year’s theme is Unidos: Inclusivity for a Stronger Nation.

UC & UC Law Celebrations & Events

UC Alumni Association Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month

CECH National Hispanic Heritage Month

Tuesday, September 27, 2022

¡Viva! A Latin American Red Carpet Premiere

6:00pm – 8:00pm, AACRC Main Lounge (60 W. Charlton St.)
Join Ethnic Programs and Services and the Council of Cultural Leaders for a red carpet celebration for Latinx Heritage Month. Fashion, music, and art will be showcased. Free food provided. RSVP via CampusLINK.

Thursday, September 29, 2022

Carlos Soltero and the Latino Community

12:05pm
Room 160
For Hispanic Heritage month the Latino/a Law Student Association welcomes Carlos Soltero, author of Latinos and American Law, a book that discusses landmark Supreme Court cases that have affected the Latino community. Carlos is a graduate of Yale Law School and a partner at Soltero Sapire Murrell PLLC in Austin, TX. He will be discussing some of the cases from his book.

Presentation of Reggaeton, an Urban Novel by Dali Amador

3:00pm – 4:00pm
Faculty Enrichment Center
Reggaeton tells the story of Castigador X, a Latin singer who succeeds in the world of music. Rafael Armenteros Benítez has talent, and he also has what any man can dream of, but he is not entirely happy and there is an intimate reason that he must accept to restart his life. Recounting his path to fame, friends, women, and money, the novel also discovers the stories of those around him, especially migrants from different Latin American countries who seek their dreams or a better life in Miami. Faculty can register at Faculty OneStop.

LEA Presents Cocina Conmigo

5:00pm – 6:00pm
Max Kade Cultural Center (Old Chem)
Join Latinx en Acción for National Hispanic Heritage Month and learn how to make arepas. RSVP via CampusLINK and be sure to state any dietary restrictions or allergies.

Wednesday, October 5, 2022

LACLS Public Health & Latinx Community Roundtable

3:30pm – 4:30pm
A&S Hall Room 53 or Zoom
RSVP via CampusLink

Monday, October 17, 2022

Hispanic Heritage Month at UCBA: Taste of Mexico Food Truck, 11:30am – 2:00pm, UCBA Muntz Traffic Circle

5 LatinX Resources to Explore Hispanic Heritage

Last week we looked at LatinX attorneys and law students. This week we explore more resources on LatinX attorneys, law students, and more.

ABA Diversity and Inclusion Center, Celebrate Hispanic/Latino/a/x Heritage Month Honoring Activists and Legal Trailblazers (2022)

This PDF by the ABA Diversity and Inclusion Center highlights LatinX legal trailblazers and activists.

ABA Wide 21-Day Hispanic Heritage Equity Habit Building Challenge

The ABA Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Council is proud to launch a 21-Day Hispanic Heritage Equity Habit Building Challenge syllabus in honor of Hispanic Heritage Month. The goal of the Challenge is to assist each of us to become more aware, compassionate, constructive, engaged people in the quest for equity, and specifically to learn more about the Hispanic Heritage, and many communities included under the “Hispanic umbrella.” It transcends our roles as lawyers. Non-lawyers are also welcome to participate.

ABA Commission on Hispanic Legal Rights and Responsibilities, Latinos in the United States: Overcoming Legal Obstacles, Engaging in Civic Life (2013)

This report for the ABA presents information with the goal of providing a foundation upon which to expand on the work that has been started during the past years. The witnesses and stakeholders who provided valuable information to the Commission candidly described the challenges facing Latino lawyers, clients, and members of the broader Latino Community.

ABA Commission on Hispanic Legal Rights and Responsibilities, Hispanics in Public Service – Pathways to Leadership Webinar (Mar. 30, 2022)

As the largest growing minority group in America, Hispanics have been entering the labor force at substantial rates, often with marketable skills, hands-on experience, and bilingual abilities. Yet for decades Hispanics have remained underrepresented in the federal workforce. This program will identify some of the largest obstacles and share personal and professional tips on how to overcome them and excel to senior leadership roles. The program also will explore strategies and best practices, such as federal training programs and enhanced mentorship opportunities, for future success at increasing the representation of Hispanics in critical federal government and policy-making positions.

Sharon Foley & Deborah L. Kidder, Hispanic Law Students’ Perceptions of Discrimination, Justice, and Career Prospects, 24 Hisp. J. of Behav. Sci. 23 (2022)

In this study,ethnic and gender discrimination perceived by minority students was investigated in a sample of 118 Hispanic law school students. Despite governmental efforts at promoting affirmative action practices,perceived discrimination can act as a barrier in the legal profession that keeps minority and female attorneys from advancing in the profession. Results were consistent with the hypotheses,suggesting that (a) female students anticipated more discrimination in the legal profession than male students; (b) the higher the perceived discrimination,the less fair the students perceived the promotion process in their future law firm will be; and (c) the lower the perceived fairness of the promotion process,the lower the satisfaction with their chosen career (the law profession) and the lower the respondents’ perceived career prospects. Practical implications and avenues for future research are discussed.

Do You Read Banned Books?

Banned Books Unite Us

September 18-24 2022 is Banned Books Week. Books unite us. Books encourage boundless exploration and allow readers to spread their wings. Stories give flight to new ideas and perspectives. Reading—especially books that set us free—expands our worldview. Censorship, on the other hand, locks away our freedom and divides us from humanity in our own cages. The American Library Association tracked 729 challenges to library, school, and university materials and services in 2021. 1,597 individual books were challenged or banned in 2021.

Top 10 Banned Books of 2021

  1. Gender Queer By Maia Kobabe
    Banned, challenged, and restricted fo rLGBTQIA+ content and because it was considered to have sexually explicit images
  2. Lawn Boy By Jonathan Evison
    Banned and challenged for LGBTQIA+ content and because it was considered to be sexually explicit.
  3. All Boys Aren’t Blue By George M. Johnson
    Banned and challenged for LGBTQIA+ content, profanity, and because it was considered to be sexually explicit
  4. Out of Darkness By Ashley Hope Perez
    Banned, challenged, and restricted for depictions of abuse and because it was considered to be sexually explicit
  5. The Hate U Give By Angie Thomas
    Banned and challenged for profanity, violence, and it was thought to promote an anti-
    police message and indoctrination of a social agenda.
  6. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian By Sherman Alexie
    Banned and challenged for profanity, sexual references, and use of a derogatory term.
  7. Me and Earl and the Dying Girl By Jesse Andrews
    Banned and challenged because it was considered sexually explicit and degrading to women.
  8. The Bluest Eye By Toni Morrison
    Banned and challenged because it depicts child sexual abuse and was considered sexually explicit.
  9. This Book is Gay By Juno Dawson
    Banned, challenged, relocated, and restricted for providing sexual education and
    LGBTQIA+ content.
  10. Beyond Magenta By Susan Kuklin
    Banned and challenged for LGBTQIA+ content and because it was considered to be sexually explicit.

Who Challenges Books?

18% Board/administration
10% Political/religious groups
6% Librarians/teachers
2% Elected officials
1% Students

Where Do Challenges Take Place?

44% School libraries
37% Public libraries
18% Schools
1% Academic/Other

Why Are Books Challenged?

According to the American Libraries Association Office of Intellectual Freedom, the top three reasons for challenging books are:

  1. Sexually Explicit
  2. Offensive Language
  3. Unsuited to Any Age Group

Did You Know?

Did you know that a major promulgator of unreported banned books are prisons?

For more on this issue:

Literature Locked Up: How Prison Book Restriction Policies Constitute the Nation’s Largest Book Ban

Censorship and Banned Book Lists in Correctional Facilities

Censorship in Prisons and Jails: A War on the Written Word

The Cruel Practice of Banning Books Behind Bars

The Marshall Project: Banning Books in Prison

Submit a Virtual Readout Video

Your words have power. Stand up to censorship and declare your literary freedoms by reading from a banned book or discussing censorship issues on camera. Readers can post a video of themselves reading from a banned book or talking about censorship. Videos may be featured on the Banned Books Week YouTube channel. Use the Virtual Readout Form to submit your video.

This Week in the Law Library …

This week in the Law Library, we’re teaching LLM students about terms and connectors searching; teaching technology in law practice; and celebrating Constitution Week, Banned Books Week, Bisexual Awareness Week, and Hispanic Heritage Month.

This Week’s Research Sessions

Monday, September 19, 2022

Legal Research & Writing for LLM Students

Shannon Kemen, Legal Technology & Research Instructional Services Librarian
Room 230
8:00am – 9:20am
Terms and Connectors Searching

Tuesday, September 20, 2022

Technology in Law Practice

Shannon Kemen, Legal Technology & Research Instructional Services Librarian
Room 107
11:10am – 12:05pm

Thursday, September 22, 2022

Technology in Law Practice

Shannon Kemen, Legal Technology & Research Instructional Services Librarian
Room 107
11:10am – 12:05pm

Celebrate Constitution Week with the Law Library

constitution-1486010_640

September 17 through September 23 is Constitution Week! In celebration, we will be highlighting constitutional law resources. For more information on Constitution Day and Constitution Week, see last Friday’s Celebrate Constitution Day post.

President Biden’s Presidential Proclamation on Constitution Day and Citizenship Day, and Constitution Week, 2022

Featured Database

HeinOnline: World Constitutions Illustrated

Research the constitutional and political development of every country in the world. The United States of America entry includes important predecessor documents to the Constitution, scholarly articles, commentaries, and more.

Featured Video

Federal Law Part 1: Overview of Constitutions & Statutes

This video, introduces US Constitutional and statutory law. It explains where they fit in the hierarchy of legal authority, what a session law is, what a code is, and the difference between official and unofficial codes. The video is 11:24 minutes long and features closed captioning and a table of contents.

Featured Study Aids

Constitutional Law Stories

Constitutional Law Stories, available through the West Academic study aid subscription, provides a student with an understanding of 15 leading U.S. constitutional law cases. It focuses on how lawyers, judges, and socioeconomic factors shaped the litigation, and why the cases have attained landmark status.

Constitutional Law National Power and Federalism: Examples & Explanations

Constitutional Law: National Power and Federalism, available through the Aspen Learning Library study aid subscription, is a problem-oriented guide to the principle doctrines of constitutional law that are covered in the typical course. This text walks the student through issues pertaining to the structure of our constitutional system, including judicial review, justiciability, national power, supremacy, the separation of powers and federalism, as well as some of the structural limitations that the Constitution imposes on state powers. Combines textual material with well-written and comprehensive examples, explanations, and questions to test students’ comprehension of the materials and provide practice in applying legal principles to fact patterns.

Understanding Constitutional Law

This text, available through the Lexis Overdrive study aid subscription, provides the current black letter Constitutional Law doctrines alongside the historical background needed to understand them and the major lines of dissenting thought. It explains the methodological approaches the Court has taken to the topics it covers and is interspersed with commentary to help readers understand both those approaches and the rules they generate.

Featured Treatise

Treatise on Constitutional Law: Substance & Procedure

Rotunda and Nowak’s Treatise on Constitutional Law – Substance and Procedure, available on Westlaw, provides scholars, practitioners, judges, and officials with an up-to-date analysis and synthesis of federal constitutional law. Focus is primarily on the Supreme Court and incorporates the political, historical, and economic background of court decisions.The text analyzes constitutional questions in terms of precedent, political science theory, economics, and American history, making the leading cases understandable concerning both their overall significance and the precise legal rules they establish.

Featured Website

The Constitution Annotated

The Constitution of the United States of America: Analysis and Interpretation (“Constitution Annotated” or “CONAN”) provides a legal analysis and interpretation of the United States Constitution based on a comprehensive review of Supreme Court case law and, where relevant, historical practices that have defined the text of the Constitution. This regularly updated resource is written in “plain English” and useful for a wide audience.

Celebrate Banned Books

Banned Books Unite Us

September 18-24 2022 is Banned Books Week. Books unite us. Books encourage boundless exploration and allow readers to spread their wings. Stories give flight to new ideas and perspectives. Reading—especially books that set us free—expands our worldview. Censorship, on the other hand, locks away our freedom and divides us from humanity in our own cages. The American Library Association tracked 729 challenges to library, school, and university materials and services in 2021. 1,597 individual books were challenged or banned in 2021.

Celebrate Bisexuality Week

Bisexuality Flag

Bisexuality Week, also known as #BiWeek, is celebrated in September (during the week of September 23rd, which is Bi Visibility Day). It promotes visibility of bisexuality and celebrates the resiliency of bisexual persons. According to Human Rights Campaign, someone who is bisexual “is someone who is emotionally, romantically or sexually attracted to more than one sex, gender or gender identity, though not necessarily simultaneously, in the same way or to the same degree.” HRC’s Brief Guide to Getting Bisexual Coverage Right. A Gallup poll found more than half of LGBT adults (54.6%) identify as bisexual. Jeffrey M. Jones, LGBT Identification Rises to 5.6% in Latest U.S. Estimate, Gallup (Feb. 24, 2021). Bisexual people are often assumed to be gay, lesbian, or heterosexual based on the gender of their partner and they experience biphobia from both inside the LGBTQ+ community and from their larger communities. Movement Advancement Project, Invisible Majority: The Disparities Facing Bisexual People and How to Remedy Them (2016).

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month

2022 Hispanic Heritage Month Poster

Hispanic Heritage Month is September 15 to October 15 and celebrates the contributions and importance of Hispanics and Latinos to the United States and those American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean, Central America, and South America. This year’s theme is Unidos: Inclusivity for a Stronger Nation.

This week, we take a look at LatinX attorneys and law students. According to the 2021 NALP Diversity Report, LatinX attorneys made up 2.86% of partners and 6.11% of associates. In Cincinnati, LatinX attorneys made up 1.27% of partners and 4.69% of associates. According to the LSAC Year to Date American Bar Association 2022 Applicant and Application Counts, 9,588 law school applicants identified as Latino or Hispanic. According to the 2021 survey by the ABA Young Lawyers Division and the ABA Media Relations and Strategic Communications Division, Black and Hispanic law school graduates generally take on more student loan debt than white students.

UC Celebrations & Events

UC Alumni Association Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month

CECH National Hispanic Heritage Month

Judy Ashton, Hoxworth CEO José Cancelas Receives Hispanic Heritage Award (Sept. 12, 2022)

LACLS Film Screening and Discussion on Oklahoma Mon Amour, Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2022 12:00pm – 2:00pm, Tangeman Center Cinema

Presentation of Reggaeton, an Urban Novel by Dali Amador, Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 3:00pm – 4:00pm at the Faculty Enrichment Center (requires UC authentication)

LEA Presents Cocina Conmigo, Thursday, September 29, 2022 5:00pm – 6:00pm, Max Kade Cultural Center

LACLS Public Health & Latinx Community Roundtable, Wednesday, October 5 3:30pm – 4:30pm, A&S Hall Room 53 or Zoom

Hispanic Heritage Month at UCBA: Taste of Mexico Food Truck, Monday, October 17, 2022, 11:30am – 2:00pm, UCBA Muntz Traffic Circle

Happy Constitution Day!

Constitution Day, September 17, 2022

constitution-1486010_640

#Constitution Day is observed each year on September 17 to commemorate the signing of the Constitution on September 17, 1787. Public Law 108-447 requires that every educational institution which received Federal funds hold a program on the Constitution for students on September 17. This year, the College of Law is celebrating Constitution Day on Friday, September 16, 2022. Constitution Day is an opportunity for all of us to reflect on the foundations of our legal system and the rule of law.

UC Law Constitution Day Speaker

Victoria Nourse, Ralph V. Whitworth Professor in Law at Georgetown Law, will discuss the Supreme Court and how its “disruptive effects” reach beyond the cases read about in newspapers, during her lecture “Democracy’s Constitution.” Professor Nourse will share her recent research (124 cases and 300 opinions) showing the Supreme Court’s “disruptive” effects reach beyond the cases read about in the newspapers. She also will sketch a blueprint of “Democracy’s Constitution” which envisions the constitution very differently than is typical for constitutional lawyers. This event will be held at 12:15 p.m., Friday, Sept. 16, 2022, in Room 160 at the College of Law.

Articles by Professor Nourse available on HeinOnline. Selected books by Professor Nourse available at the Law Library include In Reckless Hands : Skinner v. Oklahoma and the Near Triumph of American Eugenics.

Robert S. Marx Law Library Constitution Day Display

2022 Constitution Day Display

The Robert S. Marx Law Library is home to one of the largest collections of rare and special law books in Northwest. The collection consists of approximately 10,000 volumes of historical legal books and pamphlets printed during the mid-1500s through mid-1900s. Most of the items in the Collection consists of scholarly, out of print books on English and American law and legal history. These include numerous classics in the field. The books have been individually selected and function together as a comprehensive research tool providing services to scholars and legal communities locally, nationally, and internationally on various aspects of the law and legal history, thus contributing to the further advancement of legal education and scholarship. The Collection is strongest in the areas of constitutional history and early English law.

To celebrate Constitution Day, the Robert S. Marx Law Library is pleased to present a display of a few noteworthy items within the collection, including:

  • One of the earliest editions of Magna Carta, printed in London in 1578
  • The Law of Laws: or, The Excellency of the Civil Law, Above All Other Humane Laws Whatsoever. Shewing of How great use and necessity the civil law is to this nation, by Sir Rob. Wiseman, printed in London, 1686.
  • First edition of The Federalist Papers, printed in New York, 1788.
  • First edition of The Constitutions of Several Independents States of America, printed in Philadelphia, 1781.
  • Laws of the Territory of the United States Northwest of the River Ohio, printed in Cincinnati 1800.

 

The Collection also contains of very rare and unique items on the history of slavery in the United States and the works of the lawyers, judges, and activists leading to the Civil Rights Act of 1866. A few examples are on display. Of note are:

  • Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself .., printed in Dublin, Ireland by the abolitionist printer Richard D. Webb in 1846.
  • Anti-slavery addresses of 1844 and 1845, by Salmon Portland Chase and Charles Dexter Cleveland, printed in in London and Philadelphia,1867.

 

Grand Opening of the College of Law New Building

UC Law

Today is the official Grand Opening Celebration of the new home of the University of Cincinnati College of Law, featuring keynote speaker, Maureen O’Connor, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Ohio. The road to the new building was a long one! When I arrived at UC Law in 2010, there was talk of a new building. Even at that time, the College of Law building was suffering from a number of mechanical and structural issues but it took until 2016 for the UC Board of Trustees to authorize funding for a design study.

Old College of Law Building

Although the last building looked fairly modern, it was actually built in 1925. William Howard Taft’s half-brother, Charles Phelps Taft, and his wife, Anna Sinton Taft, donated $75,000 to construct a home for the College of Law. The 1925 building was known as Alphonso Taft Hall. William Howard Taft gave the keynote speech at the dedication. In 1965, a library wing was added and named after Judge Robert S. Marx, founder of Disabled American Veterans. Chief Justice Earl Warren gave the dedication speech for the Robert Marx Library.

Alphonso Taft Hall

Despite the addition of a library wing, Alphonso Taft Hall did not possess the space needed for a modern law school and a new building was discussed. Rather than construct a completely new building, it was decided that a building would be constructed around the existing 1925 building. The exterior walls of Alphonso Taft Hall became the interior walls of the new building. This construction was completed in 1982.

College of Law Old Building

In 2016, the Board of Trustees authorized funding for a design study. After some debate on the location and status of the new building, it was decided that renovation of Lindner Hall would be the best option the College of Law. Lindner Hall was built in 1986 but offered a location in the heart of campus and was more budget friendly. Perkins + Will was selected as the programming and design architect. Skanska was selected as the general contractor. The original plan was to break ground in 2019 and move in 2020. Unfortunately, COVID threw a wrench into those plans. Eventually, however, the new building moved forward. On March 1, 2021, the University broke ground on the site of the College’s new home.

New Building Fast Facts

  • 116,635 total square feet
  • Seven stories (including basement)
    • Two-story lobby atrium
    • First-floor Library Services Suite
    • First-floor Multi-purpose room
    • Second-floor outdoor terrace
    • Second-floor Library Reading Room
    • 23 classroom, seminar and private study rooms
    • 160-fixed seat auditorium/appellate courtroom
    • One 90-fixed seat classroom
    • Three 50-flexible seat classrooms
    • Seven flexible seat seminar rooms
    • Dedicated space for student services and student organizations
    • Dedicated spaces across three floors for journals, clinics and centers
    • 40+ faculty and staff offices
  • Seeking LEED Silver Certification

 

Rendering of New College of Law Building

More on the Old and New Buildings

Building Timeline, University of Cincinnati College of Law

Last Year on the Corner, University of Cincinnati College of Law

Kathleen Cardwell, Bidding Farewell to the Corner An Ode to the College of Law Building, UC News (Dec. 9, 2021)

John Bach, Law Students to Gain New Home on UC’s Campus, UC News (Feb. 23, 2021)

M.B. Reilly, Board Approves New College of Law Home on Campus, UC News (Oct. 23, 2017)

Rachel Richardson, UC Unveils Plans for New College of Law Home (Sept. 21, 2017)

The Taft Influence, UC Magazine

Irvin C. Rutter & Samuel S. Wilson, The College of Law: An Overview 1833-1983, 52 U. Cinn. L. Rev. 311 (1983) [requires UC credentials to access]

This Week in the Law Library …

This week in the Law Library, we’re teaching LLM students about secondary sources; teaching technology in law practice; and celebrating the grand opening of our new building, Constitution Day, and Taft Week.

This Week’s Research Sessions

Monday, September 12, 2022

Legal Research & Writing for LLM Students

Shannon Kemen, Legal Technology & Research Instructional Services Librarian
Room 230
8:00am – 9:20am
Secondary Sources

Tuesday, September 13, 2022

Technology in Law Practice

Shannon Kemen, Legal Technology & Research Instructional Services Librarian
Room 107
11:10am – 12:05pm

College of Law New Building Grand Opening

Rendering of New College of Law Building

On Tuesday, September 13th, we will celebrate our new building!

10:30 am – 12:30 pm, Atrium

  • 10:30 am: Coffee and Donuts
  • 11:00 am: Remarks and Ribbon Cutting
  • 12:15 pm: Open House

Keynote speaker, Maureen O’Connor, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Ohio.

Learn more and register at Building Next.

Celebrate Taft Week

Portrait of William Howard Taft
This week is Taft Week at the College of Law! President & Chief Justice William Howard Taft graduated from University of Cincinnati Law School in 1880. SBA is featuring several events in celebration. Visit the Law Library’s Taft Week Guide for fun and interesting facts about Taft.

Monday, September 12

Donuts in Honor of Taft Week, 10:00 am, Atrium. Brought to you by SBA

Wednesday, September 14

Taft Week Keynote Lecture, 12:30 pm, Room 160Professor Chris Bryant will discuss William Howard Taft’s view on presidential power and his legacy as it pertains to UC Law.

Friday, September 16

Taft Week Happy Hour, 5:00 pm, Taft Ale House.

Constitution Day Celebration, September 16, 2022

constitution-1486010_640
#Constitution Day is observed each year on September 17 to commemorate the signing of the Constitution on September 17, 1787. Public Law 108-447 requires that every educational institution which received Federal funds hold a program on the Constitution for students. This year the College of Law’s Constitution Day speaker is Victoria Nourse, Ralph V. Whitworth Professor in Law and Director of the Center on Congressional Studies at Georgetown Law. She will speak on “Democracy’s Constitution.” The 2021 U.S. Supreme Court term’s blockbuster cases on abortion, guns, and climate change, are just the beginning of a revolution in constitutional doctrine, which looks decidedly to the past to construct legal rules. The very lingua franca of constitutional law is about to change. Professor Nourse will share her recent research (124 cases and 300 opinions) showing the Supreme Court’s “disruptive” effects reach beyond the cases read about in the newspapers. She also will sketch a blueprint of “Democracy’s Constitution” which envisions the constitution very differently than is typical for constitutional lawyers. The lecture is made possible through the generous support of the Alfred B. Katz Constitution Day Fund in memory of Alfred B. Katz ’35. More at Constitution Day Event Details.

In honor of Constitution Day, the Law Library will also feature a display of rare books from our collection that are related to the U.S. Constitution.

Featured Database

U.S. Presidential Library on HeinOnline

This database includes messages and papers of the presidents, daily and weekly compilations of presidential documents, public papers of the presidents, documents relating to impeachment, Title 3 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) and a host of other related works. In celebration of Taft Week, take a look at some of the resources on President Taft available in this library:

Robert Lee Dunn, William Howard Taft American (1908)

Frederick C. Hicks, William Howard Taft: Yale Professor of Law & New Haven Citizen (1945)

Francis McHale, President and Chief Justice: The Life and Public Services of William Howard Taft (1931)

Raymond Patterson, Taft’s Training for the Presidency (1908)

Presidential Addresses and State Papers of William Howard Taft

Taft Papers on League of Nations

William S. White, Taft Story (1954)

Featured Guide

Taft Week: William Howard Taft

William Howard Taft served as the 27th President of the United States (1909-1913) and later the 10th Chief Justice of the United States (1921-1930). He is the only person to have served in both of these offices. This guide directs you to resources to learn more about President and Chief Justice Taft.

Featured Video

William Howard Taft and the Constitution 

National Constitution Center President and CEO Jeffey Rosen unveils his newest book on only man to serve as president and chief justice – William Howard Taft. Rosen argues that Taft was our most judicial president and presidential chief justice and explores Taft’s crucial role in shaping how America balances populism with the rule of law. The discusion will be moderated by Judge Douglas Ginsburg, who calls Taft “the most under-appreciated constitutional gure since George Mason.”

Featured Study Aids

Constitutional Law National Power and Federalism: Examples & Explanations

Available via the Aspen Learning Library study aid subscription, this is a problem-oriented guide to the principle doctrines of constitutional law that are covered in the typical course. The text walks the student through issues pertaining to the structure of our constitutional system, including judicial review, justiciability, national power, supremacy, the separation of powers and federalism, as well as some of the structural limitations that the Constitution imposes on state powers. Combines textual material with well-written and comprehensive examples, explanations, and questions to test studentsrsquo; comprehension of the materials and provide practice in applying legal principles to fact patterns. New to the Ninth Edition: Inclusion of more than 40 new Supreme Court cases, more sophisticated discussion of the federal preemption doctrine, updated treatment of presidential impeachment, expanded discussion of the executive privilege doctrine, and deeper coverage of the appointment and removal of federal officials.

Principles of Constitutional Structure

Available via the West Academic study aid subscription, this text offers an overview of federalism, the separation of powers, and related matters of constitutional structure. It covers such topics as: the lawmaking powers of the national government (including those powers conferred by the Commerce Clause, the Taxing and Spending Clause, the Necessary and Proper Clause, the Enforcement Clauses of the Reconstruction Amendments, and other sources of federal legislative authority); federalism-based “external” constraints on congressional power (including those provided by the anti-commandeering principle, the “equal sovereignty” principle, and principles of state-sovereign immunity); federalism-based limits on state authority (including those imposed by the dormant Commerce Clause, the Article IV Privileges and Immunities Clause, and statutory preemption doctrine); structural constitutional principles concerning governmental entities other than the states (including Native nations, overseas territories, and the District of Columbia); and the horizontal allocation of power across the three branches of the federal government (including with respect to foreign and military affairs, the federal administrative state, the appointment and removal of executive-branch officials, impeachment, presidential and legislative immunities from judicial process, and the powers of the federal courts).

Understanding Constitutional Law

Available via the LexisNexis Digital Library study aid subscription, this study aid covers all of the central concepts and issues students encounter in any basic constitutional law course. Structure of Government issues revolve around the twin themes of federalism and separation of powers. Individual rights and liberties follow a concept organization-Due Process, Equal Protection, and First Amendment. Clearly written and authoritative, Understanding Constitutional Law addresses the central concepts and issues students encounter in most Constitutional Law casebooks. “Structure of government” issues revolve around the twin themes of federalism and separation of powers. Individual rights and liberties follow a concept organization – Due Process, Equal Protection, and First Amendment.

Featured Book

William Howard Taft, American by Robert Lee Dunn (public domain e-book)

Featured Website

The American Presidency Project, William Howard Taft

The goal of the American Presidency Project is to be recognized as the authoritative, non-partisan on-line source for presidential public documents. Their entry on President Taft includes speeches, executive orders, and more.

 

Celebrating Dean Williams

Dean Williams
After 21 years, Dean Verna Williams is leaving the College of Law. Yesterday we celebrated all of her wonderful accomplishments and thanked her for her leadership. It has been my pleasure and privilege to have served with Dean Williams at UC Law for over a decade,working first with her when she was a faculty colleague and then as dean. Whether as a faculty member, co-director of the Judge Nathaniel Jones Center for Race, Gender, and Social Justice, or dean, Dean Williams has continually demonstrated her care for students and colleagues even during the most difficult times. She helped to heal the College of Law and shepherded us through COVID and a new building. Truly, she will be missed.

Learn more about Dean Verna Williams

Scholarship

Dean Williams Scholarship (Cincinnati Law Scholarship Repository)

Dean Verna Williams in Her Own Words (Selected Video Interviews and Remarks)

2020 YWCA Career Woman of Achievement, Verna L. Williams

Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber, Making Black History, Verna Williams

Local 12, Making Black History: Verna Williams Inspires as First Black Dean of UC College of Law

Black Pre-Law Talks: Verna L. Williams, Esq., Dean, University of Cincinnati College of Law, The 15th Annual National Black Pre-Law Conference and Law Fair 2019, Columbia Law School, New York, New York

Interview with a Law School Dean, Prelaw Magazine, National Jurist

Cincinnati Bar Association, 10-Minute Mentoring: The Future of Legal Education with Dean Verna Williams