National Library Week is April 13 – 19

Why Not Stop In Today!

Your friendly neighborhood law librarians and staff in the Marx Law Library are happy to see you any time of year, but we especially invite you to come by this week. National Library Week helps remind all of us of the important role that libraries of all types play in all kinds of communities. While the meaning of “library” may be changing with the shift of many resources to digital form, the fundamental characteristics remain stable. Libraries and librarians are dedicated to getting our customers, traditionally called “patrons,” the information AND personal assistance they need when they need it, quickly and efficiently. Our librarians maintain access to printed and digital resources, teach legal research in multiple settings, and participate in local, regional, and national associations to learn more and to serve their constituents and their profession. Whether you are a student, professor, staff member, or visitor, we stand at the ready to help fill your legal information needs.

Upcoming Legal Research Sessions

  • Monday, April 14
    • Advocacy, Professor Bradley’s section 4
    • Low Cost & Free Resources with Shannon Kemen
    • 10:40 a.m. — 12:05 p.m.
    • Room 302


  • Tuesday, April 15
    • Advocacy, Professor Bradley’s section 2
    • Low Cost & Free Resources with Susan Boland
    • 1:30 p.m. — 2:55 p.m.
    • Room 302


  • Wednesday, April 16
    • Advocacy, Professor Lenhart’s section 1
    • Low Cost & Free Resources with Ron Jones
    • 9:00 a.m. — 10:25 a.m.
    • Room 100A


This Week in the Law Library

Legal Research Sessions

  • Monday, April 7
    • Professor Bradley’s Advocacy section 4
      • 10:40 a.m. — 12:05 p.m.
      • Room 302
      • Administrative Law with Shannon Kemen
  • Tuesday, April 8
    • Professor Bradley’s Advocacy section 2
      • 1:30 p.m. — 2:55 p.m.
      • Room 302
      • Administrative Law with Shannon Kemen
  • Wednesday, April 9
    • Professor Lenhart’s Advocacy section 1
      • 9:00 a.m. — 10:25 a.m.
      • Room 100A
      • Administrative Law with Ron Jones
  • Thursday, April 10
    • Professor Bradley’s Advocacy section 4
      • 10:40 a.m. — 12:05 p.m.
      • Room 302
      • Cost Effective Research with Shannon Kemen
    • Professor Smith’s Advocacy section 3
      • 10:40 a.m. — 12:05 p.m.
      • Room 100B
      • Cost Effective Research with Susan Boland
    • Professor Bradley’s Advocacy section 2
      • 1:30 p.m. — 2:55 p.m.
      • Room 302
      • Cost Effective Research with Susan Boland

UC Law Library & Lexis 1-L Brunch

  • Wednesday, April 9
  • 12:15 p.m. — 1:15 p.m.
  • Room 114
  • Researching from Start to Finish with Ashley Russell and Shannon Kemen
  • (For registered participants)

 

Make-Up Class for Advanced Legal Research

  • Friday, April 11
    • 12:15 p.m. — 1:40 p.m.
    • Room 302

 

Featured Research Guide

 

Featured Research Database

 

This Week in the Law Library

Legal Research Sessions This Week

  • Tuesday, April 1, 10:40 a.m. — 12:05 p.m.
    • Professor Smith’s section 3
    • Administrative Law with Susan Boland
    • Room 100B
  • Wednesday, April 2, 12:15 p.m. — 1:15 p.m.
    • UC Law Library and Lexis Lunch & Learn
    • Lexis Advance Research Tips with Ashley Russell
    • 50 State Research with Shannon Kemen
    • Room 302
    • Prior registration was required. See below for next week’s Law Library & Lexis 1L Brunch


UC Law Library & Lexis 1L Brunch

  • Worried about researching on the job? You are invited to join the UC Law Library and Lexis for a legal research brunch aimed specifically at helping first year law students prepare to complete research assignments as summer associates. This session will cover the research process generally and will walk you through a practice research assignment from beginning to end using print and electronic resources.
  • Each attendee will receive a FREE Lunch + Lexis points.
  • Thursday, April 10, 12:15 p.m. — 1:15 p.m.
  • Room 114
  • To reserve your seat, RSVP at Surveymonkey® by Friday, April 4th.


Featured Research Guide

Review the ins and outs of Administrative Law Research with the guide by Susan Boland.

Returning May 19th and 20th, our annual Summer Research Boot Camp

This annual event, presented jointly with Chase Law School, will help you perform terrific legal research during your summer months. Watch for more information soon!


Fair Use Week: Learn a Little About Copyright

The doctrine of “fair use” was originally announced by the U.S. Supreme Court and was subsequently adopted by Congress in the 1976 revisions to copyright law. Today the meaning of fair use can be found at 17 U.S.C. § 107. This week many academic libraries are honoring fair use to point out its crucial role in scholarly writing. The Law Library has a guide to fair use (and the T.E.A.C.H. Act) for faculty and students. Kevin Smith of Duke University, one of the country’s first scholarly communications officers, provides information and links to several resources in his blog post. So the next time you quote someone’s article or enjoy a parody, give a little thanks to “fair use.”

Veterans Day, 2013

Today, November 11, is Veterans Day, a public holiday in the United States. Veterans Day was originally celebrated as Armistice Day, and the historians among you will recall that the armistice ending World War I went into effect on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month, 1918. Congress acted to rename the holiday, “To honor veterans on the 11th day of November of each year, a day dedicated to world peace.” Ch. 250, 68 Stat. 168 (1954). In the late 1960′s, when Congress adopted legislation to create more three-day weekends on public holidays, Veterans day was moved to the fourth Monday in October. This lasted only a few years, and with popular sentiment favoring the traditional date of November 11, it was returned to that date in 1978. Pub. L. 94-97, 89 Stat. 479 (1975).

The law library has a special connection to Veterans Day. The library’s namesake, Robert S. Marx, a Hamilton County judge, was a founder of the Disabled American Veterans. The organization’s mission statement reads, “We are dedicated to a single purpose: empowering veterans to lead high-quality lives with respect and dignity. We accomplish this by ensuring that veterans and their families can access the full range of benefits available to them; fighting for the interests of America’s injured heroes on Capitol Hill; and educating the public about the great sacrifices and needs of veterans transitioning back to civilian life.” You can read of the DAV’s founding and the role played by Robert S. Marx on its website.

We in the law library join our fellow citizens in expressing our gratitude for the service and sacrifice made on behalf of our country by U.S. veterans.


Marx Law Library celebrates First-Year Student Common Reading Program

Marx Law Library is happy to support the First-Year Student Common Reading Program by collaborating with Langsam Library on their display, Human Rights and Human Wrongs. The display features the College of Law’s Human Rights Quarterly and the Pennsylvania Studies in Human Rights. Both are edited by Bert Lockwood, Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Director, Urban Morgan Institute for Human Rights. It’s located in the entryway to Langsam Library. The First-Year Student Common Reading Program chose Michael Sandel’s Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do? as this year’s book. The book will be read both in and out of class by students, faculty, librarians, residence hall staff, and others. The purpose of the Common Reading Program is to “provide an opportunity for an integrated experience for all members of the University of Cincinnati community and will demonstrate the interconnectedness of seemingly unrelated disciplines to our students.” ( UC First-Year Student Common Reading Program)

The U.N.’s Universal Declaration of Human Rights occupies the center of the display because it was the first statement (1948) that defined and declared support for human rights by nearly all nations. The right side of the display describes the Urban Morgan Human Rights Institute, the Human Rights Quarterly, and the Pennsylvania Studies in Human Rights and includes samples of those publications. The right side includes photographs and captions from recent, egregious violations of human rights from all over the world.

Please take a few minutes to go to Langsam Library to witness a celebration of one of the great strengths of our College.

View the Exhibit Poster

Submitted for Your Consideration: Two Classes That Will Help Distinguish You in a Crowd

As spring semester registration opens, we’d like to tell you about two classes taught by librarian faculty. These classes, Advanced Legal Research and Technology in the Law Practice, offer skills training and substantive knowledge in areas that will benefit you, whether you practice in a firm or strike out on your own.

Advanced Legal Research delves deeply into learning how to find the information you need. We begin with the strategy of constructing your research: identifying issues and concepts, selecting appropriate resources, and constructing a good search syntax. We follow up with hands-on exercises in every class. You’ll work in teams, letting you appreciate your teammates’ particular talents. You’ll work hard for your three credit hours. At the end of the semester, you may echo what past participants have said: “This was an awesome course that will help me practice law. In that sense, I think it is one of the most valuable upper level courses.” “I think this course should be mandatory for upper-class students.” Take this class and you will NOT be one of the new associates about whom so many partners say, “I wish our new associates knew how to research a simple problem.” Susan Boland, Ron Jones, and Ken Hirsh invite you to be a crackerjack legal researcher.

Technology in the Law Practice introduces you to the professional side of technology. You may already be a social network maven, but did you know that your tweets and posts could create disciplinary problems? Can you keep your client communications confidential using email? How do you manage your cases with your computer? How has electronic record-keeping changed discovery? Shannon Kemen and Ken Hirsh will move technology from the background to front and center in your academic and professional thinking.